Haemophilia in European Royalty

Haemophilia in European Royalty

  • High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Haemophilia figured prominently in the history of European royalty in the 19th and 20th centuries. Queen Victoria, through two of her five daughters, passed the mutation to various royal houses across the continent, including the royal families of Spain, Germany and Russia. Victoria's son Leopold suffered from the disease. For this reason, haemophilia was once popularly called "the royal disease". The sex-linked X chromosome disorder manifests almost entirely in males, although the gene for the disorder is inherited from the mother. However females carrying the faulty X chromosome can pass the chromosome to their descendents. Expression of the disorder is more common in males due to the fact that females have two X chromosomes while the male only has one. If a male's X chromosome is defective, there is not another to mask the disorder. In about 30% of cases, however, there is no family history of the disorder and the condition is the result of ... (vollständige Produktbeschreibung -> siehe Tabelle unten)
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Haemophilia in European Royalty

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Haemophilia figured prominently in the history of European royalty in the 19th and 20th centuries. Queen Victoria, through two of her five daughters, passed the mutation to various royal houses across the continent, including the royal families of Spain, Germany and Russia. Victoria's son Leopold suffered from the disease. For this reason, haemophilia was once popularly called "the royal disease". The sex-linked X chromosome disorder manifests almost entirely in males, although the gene for the disorder is inherited from the mother. However females carrying the faulty X chromosome can pass the chromosome to their descendents. Expression of the disorder is more common in males due to the fact that females have two X chromosomes while the male only has one. If a male's X chromosome is defective, there is not another to mask the disorder. In about 30% of cases, however, there is no family history of the disorder and the condition is the result of a spontaneous gene mutation.